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, and these are u.s. company that is have their core base here. the good news is i think if we meet the object i haves -- objectives that we've talked about, we will stimulate clean technologies, software, hardware, all of the real disruptive technologies that we are talking about. they are global, their competitors are global, they have to be global. i think if we do the right thing, we are going to do well by exports. which is real positive. >> this is a really important point. we tend to maybe think of these things in silos. but one the president's key initiatives is doubling exports over the next five years. and, of course, that involves, you know, large companies, boeing and others. when you look at the numbers, the real way we're going to do is in increasing in the small and medium-sized enterprises. turns out that 30% of the exports are from small and medium-sized enterprises. and that's disproportionally small. and there's only 250,000 small companies that export. so if you look at the math, there's almost three million small businesses $30 million smalls. xiii of them who have traded go
worse snow? germany. a big freeze in france. in the u.s., the worst blizzards of the decades. but despite all of that, but despite of all that, their economies grew in the fourth quarter. and while our growth has worsened, theirs have improved. the german economy -- the chancellor -- the chancellor should just calm down just a little bit, mr. deputy speaker. the german economy is forecast to grow more strongly than it was last year. so is the united states. growth in the world economy has been revised up. but which is the major country downgrading its growth forecast, the united kingdom. mr. deputy speaker, it's not the wrong type of snow to blame. it's the wrong type of chancellor. it's the wrong type of chancellor in the wrong type of government with the wrong priorities for britain. mr. deputy speaker, mr. deputy speaker -- >> courtesy should be shown but can i say to everybody, the public also wants to hear what the opposition has got to say. if the cabinet members do not want to listen, then please leave the chair. some people may agree, some may disagree. the opposition
. >> i think it's also an issue for journal education. i think at least in the u.s., almost 2/3 of students in journalist school are female. >> primarily female? >> i think to some extent, it's a matter of giving them the training and incentive and also for female faculty to mentor young journalist students so they have in their head the idea that maybe they can do that. also going back to barbara's issue about skills or confidence. i think it takes a particular tenacity to be an investigative reporter. you have to be willing to stick with something to get your foot in the door. i had a student -- i used to teach investigative reporting as one the journalism courses that i taught. and my most aggressive student was a female. and even on the story assignment for class, she found out this guy wasn't going to give her an interview. she found out what time they came to work, and she was there to meet him at 7 a.m. when she arrived. she interviewed him outside of the door of his office building because he wouldn't give her an interview. i think it takes a certain amount. it can sta
benefit for civil society. and also give that many of these are u.s. based companies, is there a role for u.s. policy to promote the freedom to connect? >> one more from this side of the room. the way in the back. >> thank you. my name is john wooden. thank you all for your really excellent recitation. jackie, i was interested in your comment about more bottom-up development. others wonder if you could operationalize that with some examples. and also to ask whether the model of cooperatives and particular worker cooperatives can play a constructive role here? thank you. >> okay, let's come back to the panel, let him respond to this set of questions and then i think would probably have time for at least one more round in addition to that one. i think perhaps the most efficient way to do this is just simpler to start at the right and work our way across and let people select a question they would choose to enter. if any remain unanswered at the end you have to catch them at coffee after the meeting is over. >> so i will start with the doctor's comments, but maybe take it from low bit of
europe needs to stop being naive ought play needs to --. how big is that for the u.s.. >> following the list there's a strong sense. i give a lot of credit to our european partners. we don't have any illusions about where the european publics are and the skepticism they have about this. but it is a way forward to the political and military strategy and this is a price our partners have played a role in slovenia and bosnia offering troops for afghanistan. this is the kind of thing we look for and we see the countries in the western balkans showing the will and determination and understanding, to share the burden of responsibility. >> they thought there was a problem, they made a harsh siege. what in your view to contribute more to the military situation whenever there is one rather than -- jobs in the united states and think it can do judgment in development work? >> i don't think europe thinks that. a friend of mine and somebody i'd meet every month to talk about nato collaboration. he has a job worry about defense commitments. and looking at issues of finance and the european union
contacts or other u.s. officials' contacts with the opposition since the -- that first meeting in paris between the secretary and mr. jabril. and tell us if you are at all closer to making a decision on whether to follow the lead that france so helpfully started out a couple weeks and recognizing them a legitimate government. >> since the start of the crisis, when we saw that the council had constituted itself as some kind of temporary governing body, i and certainly members of my staff recognized that some of those people were people that we had dealt with during our tenures in libya. and so right from the start, i had been reaching out to the leaders of the council. and since that time, since the embassy was reconstituted here as i said, we had extensive dealings and contacts through our various programs, especially educational programs, with the people of the east. i had a very active public affairs section in libya, and they were always communicating with the -- with the doctors and jurists and people who, in fact, now are part of the council. so we had a good in to those people. si
with rear admiral gerald huber providing an update on the situation in libya as well as the u.s. military action against government forces there. live from the pentagon. >> we're going to amp up the volume a little bit and then we'll be ready to go. we're here at the pentagon and we're pleased to be joined today by navy rear admiral girard p. huber u.s. naval forces europe and africa, director for policy resources and strategy. admiral huber is here to give a view on an operational update be it phone link again once again as yesterday from the uss mount whitney afloat in the mediterranean. admiral huber became the director of policy resources and strategy at u.s. naval forces europe and africa in august of 2009. he is currently the chief of staff for joint task force odyssey dawn, the task force established to provide operational and tactical international response to the unrest in libya and enforcement of u.n. security council resolution 1973. with that, admiral, i'll turn things over to you. >> good afternoon, everyone. thank you, dave. thank you for the opportunity to talk about joint
around a number of states and spoke to a series of people in the u.s. senators to congressman to beat on the left and right, journalists, and tanks, to ordinary citizens. the same preclusion kept leaping out again and again. most americans don't realize how lucky they are. you know, the political institutions that define this country are in many cases unique in almost all cases talking about the term, the recall mechanism. the initiative and referendum ballots procedure. i'm talking about states rights. i'm talking about open primaries in a totally unique feature, but one that makes legislatures answerable to the rest of us. and above all i'm talking about almost everybody from the share to the school board. it's human nature to take for granted that which is familiar to us. but it's these institutions growing organically out of the constitution that is serve to keep your government and your people free. sometimes i say this and they say well, there are cultural difference is. we are naturally people who got away from the monarchies and closets of the old world. i'm afraid that explan
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8